2 – SAUSAGES AT HOME…………. (“Fresh” and “Cooked-Cured” Types)

2 – SAUSAGES AT HOME…………. (“Fresh” and “Cooked-Cured” Types)

Much of what our members do fits into this category. …so “let ‘er rip!”

 

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218 thoughts on “2 – SAUSAGES AT HOME…………. (“Fresh” and “Cooked-Cured” Types)

  1. Authentic Polish Kielbasa (Hot Smoked)
    (10 lb. Formula)

    Did you know that Polish Kielbasa (smoked sausage) was an all-pork recipe until 1964? That’s the year the Polish government decided to allow 20% beef into the product. The only other ingredients in the traditional recipe are salt, sugar, pepper, garlic, and marjoram.

    Pork Butt…… 10 lbs. @ 32° F.
    Salt…… 4-1/2 Tbl.Spns.
    Cure #1…… 2 tspns.
    Pepper…… 1-1/2 Tbl.Spns.
    Sugar…… 2 tspns.
    Garlic…… 4 large or 5 medium cloves
    Marjoram…… 3 tspns.
    Water…… 1 cup
    32-35 mm. hog casings

    Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer while you separate the fat from the lean meat using a sharp knife. Cut the meat into 1” cubes to keep long strands of sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat using a 3/8” plate and the pork fat using a 3/16” plate. Place the fat into the freezer while you mix the Cure #1 with a little water (for uniform distribution) and add it to the meat. Work with small batches, refrigerating the meat at every opportunity. Next, mix the meat with all the remaining ingredients (except the frozen fat), kneading the mixture to develop the proteins myosin and actin, creating a “sticky meat paste” (primary bind). Finally, fold in the frozen fat and distribute it equally throughout the mixture. Depending upon various recipes or preferences, the sausage may now be refrigerated several hours for maturing, or the sausage may be immediately stuffed into casings to avoid smearing while the fat remains frozen.

    Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour or place them into a smokehouse preheated to 130°F. (54°C.) for an hour with the damper fully open to assist with moisture elimination. When the sausages are dry to the touch, introduce hickory smoke and adjust the damper to only ¼ the way open. Gradually, only a couple of degrees at twenty minutes intervals, raise the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature (IMT) registers 152°F. (67°C.). This procedure must be done slowly to avoid breaking the collagen and liquefying the fat. Remove the sausages, showering them with cold water until the IMT drops to less than 90°F. (32°C.). This sausage remains perishable and must be refrigerated.

    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

  2. Knackwurst

    Howdy Sausagemakers! While I was going through some ancient family recipes from the old country (Switzerland), I came across some instructions from a huge Danish Supply house that dates back more than a century and a half. It is for making 100 pounds of German “Knackwurst”. The original recipe specified ‘ground saltpeter’ as the curing agent but I’ve calculated the correct amount of Cure #1 containing sodium nitrite at 156 p.p.m. The supply house failed to give an exact measurement of garlic. The instructions simply read, “add a small quantity of grated garlic”. So, I simply added the amount of garlic powder recommended in “Home Production Of Quality Meats And Sausages” by Stan and Adam Marianski. The original recipe also specifies that the meat be chopped “very fine” and stuffed into beef rounds or hog casings, hung in the air for 8 days, then cold smoked another 6 days before preserving them in a “cool and dry place”.

    I compared the formula to Rytek Kutas’ “Knockwurst” recipe. He liked to add a few more ingredients including powdered dextrose, mace, allspice, coriander, and a whopping amount of paprika. The man also liked to hot-smoke this sausage, (he sold hot-smoking cabinets) placing an “emulsified” mince into small or medium beef rounds, or 38-42 m.m. hog casings. He placed them on smokesticks, allowed them to dry completely, then put them into a smokehouse preheated to 135˚F. (57˚C.) one hour without smoke. He then raised the temperature to 165˚F. (74˚C.) and then applied hickory or alder smoke until the internal meat temperature reached 152˚F. (67˚C.). I suspect that you are not going to make a hundred pounds of this sausage, so I’ve written a recipe for 10 pounds of Knackwurst sausage

    Knackwurst – Ten lbs. Swiss Recipe ( 4.5 kg. using Prague Powder #1)
    6.0 lbs. lean pork
    1.4 lbs. lean beef
    2.6 lbs. fat pork
    11.32 grams (0.4 oz.) Prague Powder Cure #1 (American = 2 level teaspoons)
    81 grams salt
    0.6 oz. black pepper
    0.25 oz. caraway seeds (2.5 tspns.)
    0.15 oz. garlic powder (1.5 tspn.)

    *It is interesting to note that Rytek Kutas’s Knockwurst Recipe also includes the following ingredients. Why not try them? I especially like the addition of dextrose to “sweeten” and balance the sausage.

    4 tblspns. powdered dextrose
    1 tblspn. mace
    ½ tspn. allspice
    1 tspn. coriander
    2 tblspns. paprika

    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

  3. Lone Peak Linguiza
    Portuguese Linguiza Sausage

    A couple of years ago, a man from Seattle sent me a note that said my Linguiza recipe was awful and he would never try it again. He said he followed my recipe exactly… that is until he found that he had no red burgundy on hand. So, he substituted some of his “cousin’s special apple-brandy”, which was made in his own basement! His disdain for “my” recipe was evident as he even quit our website.

    Linguiza is made very coarsely ground often through a commercial 3/4″ plate. Linguiza is usually stuffed into hog casings and is quite different tasting than most other sausages. Some people say the taste is unique and takes a little getting used to. Outside of continental Portugal, Azores Islands, Madeira Islands and Brazil, Linguiza is also popular in Goa (India’s smallest state), Southeastern Massachusetts, Massachusetts’ North Shore, Rhode Island, Southeastern Connecticut, and parts of California, Oregon, Seattle, New Jersey, Hawaii, and Okinawa. It is also available in many grocery stores in southern and central New Hampshire, and southern Maine. In these regions it is typically sliced before being braised or grilled.

    The folks at Sausage Mania sent me a copy of their ingredients for Portuguese Linguiza – a very simple recipe from a Portuguese tapas bar in San Francisco, near Fisherman’s Wharf. It contains sherry (Spanish wine) rather than vinegar and the only spices are salt and paprika. Sausage Mania says, “Dry sherries give sausage an unpleasant, flat taste. Try instead, Harvey’s Bristol Cream, which is rich, sweet and full-bodied.”

    • Ground pork: 1 lb.
    • Coarse salt: 1/2 teaspoon
    • Dark sherry: 2 ounces
    • Paprika: 1-1/8 tablespoon

    I’ve learned over time, that alcohol added into sausage by spraying it into the primary bind as it develops the actin and myosin proteins. There is actually a scientific reasoning for this and I’ll share it with you if you care to email me. More than a tablespoon of alcohol in a 10 pound sausage recipe of any type, will just start breaking down and modifying the proteins, causing mushy meat. Better to serve good wine at the table – it’s just not necessary in sausage although many will disagree. Here’s my favorite recipe for making Linguisa. Authentic “sweet Hungarian paprika” and plenty of black pepper are a “must” in my kitchen.

    10 lbs. pork butt
    2 tspns. Cure #1 (USA)
    4-1/2 Tblspns (1.8%) salt
    2 tblspns. sweet Hungarian paprika
    1 tblspn. garlic powder
    1 tspn. coriander
    1 tspn. red pepper flakes
    1 tblspn. sugar
    1 tspn. powdered ginger
    2 tspns. black pepper
    2 cups soy protein concentrate
    5 oz. Greek Xinomavro wine (or good Italian red burgundy)
    1 cup (or less) ice water – to adjust consistency of texture

    Grind the pork using your largest plate. (1/2 inches is ideal but 3/8” will suffice). Mix all the meat together and knead it to develop the proteins. Place the cure into the cup of icewater and stir the mixture evenly throughout the meat. Add the remaining ingredients and continue to mix the meat just until a sticky meat paste is developed and shows “soft peaks” when pulled apart. Don’t get carried away “developing” the proteins, as the final texture may become “rubbery” or tough. Simply mix it until it develop soft peaks when you pull it apart.
    Stuff the sausage into 36 m.m. hog casings and place 5 inch links on smokesticks inside a preheated smoker at 150˚F. (66˚C.) with the dampers open. When the sausage appears to be dry to the touch after thirty or forty minutes, raise the smokehouse temperature gradually (only a couple of degrees every ten to fifteen minutes) to 160˚F. (71°C.) introducing light smoke for an hour. After an hour, raise the smoker temperature once more to 165˚F. (74˚C) while continuing the smoke if desired. When the sausages reach the internal meat temperature of 150˚ F. (66˚C.), shower them with cold water until they drop to room temperature. Refrigerate the sausage as this is a smoked-cooked product, not a dry-cured sausage.

    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

  4. Every time I run low on chorizo (yikes!), I always try to make a pound or two of something new, a pound or two of a favorite older recipe, and then scale what’s left in a chorizo recipe.

    It’s time for kabanosy! …time also to re-run that good andouille recipe, for gumbo once winter sets in and it goes below 50 degrees around here. Both ought to be great, smoked, using that bag of whiskey barrel pellets that I bought last summer.

    The rest of the pork goes to chorizo (made as a fresh sausage), this time with a shot of Sriracha in it. Yeow! …that’s good. As for something new, this time, I’ll try a new chicken sausage recipe- – just boned out 1-1/2 kilos of thighs.

    I don’t care WHAT you say about Chuckwagon, he’s right about kabanosy. It’s delicious, and it’s been too long since we’ve had any around here.
    Duk

    1. …got that andouille batch ground and mixed this morning, as well as some Kabanosy and a new chicken sausage recipe. It’s based on a Moroccan spice scheme that we like to use when we grill chicken. If it turns out well, I’ll post it. If not… Hey! What was that, over there? (…zoom!)
      Duk

  5. Chuckwagon’s Lone Peak Pastrami (20 lb. formula) P. 1
    With “Shotgun Sanford’s .12 Gauge Mustard” – (Mustard Dressing For Pastrami)

    “Basturma” originated in Asia Minor where people yet today make the recipe using camel meat. Historically, even horsemeat has been used. Later, in Romania, a highly spiced pork product known as “pastrama” was developed about the time Slavic Jews in Europe fashioned a kosher “beef version” known as corned beef – the “corns” referring to the coarse grains of salt used to cure the meat. Introduced to America by the immigrating Jewish community, “corning” beef became popular long before refrigeration was devised or commonly utilized. Today, more often than not, we make it for its unique flavor and texture. Technically, pastrami is “kicked up” corned beef, having an outside layer of crushed coriander seeds and black peppercorns rubbed and pressed into the meat before it is smoked. Round up 20 lbs. of beef brisket or beef plate and then make a 40° SAL curing brine by mixing the following ingredients:

    1 gallon water
    7-1/2 tblspns. (136 g.) Prague Powder Cure #1
    1 pound (453 g.) kosher salt (coarse)
    3 tblspns. coriander seeds (added for its flavor)
    2 tblspns. black peppercorns (added for “spiciness” – please crack the peppercorns – don’t pulverize them.
    1 tlbspn. white peppercorns (cracked for “spiciness” – if not available, use additional black peppercorns.
    8 cloves fresh garlic (minced to provide flavor)
    2 tblspns. yellow mustard seeds (added for “spiciness”)
    3 tblspns. brown sugar (added to provide sweetness)
    3 tblspns. paprika (added to provide pungency and spicy hot quality)

    A pound of salt in a gallon of water is an old favorite (easy to remember) of many sausage makers. This brine is 40 SAL degrees and about 10.5% salt. Some people prefer a more “sturdy” 60 SAL solution by using 1-1/2 lbs. of salt (nearly 16% salt by weight). Of course, the duration in the brine is shorter and it is a little “stiff” for poultry, but just fine for beef or pork. Toast the peppercorns and seeds in a dry skillet a few minutes, to release their oils and flavor. Stir all the ingredients into the water, bring the solution to boil, remove it from the heat, and allow it to return to room temperature.

    (Continued in next post)

  6. Chuckwagon’s Lone Peak Pastrami (20 lb. formula) P. 2

    Pump the briskets (or plates) in several places with enough brine to equal 10% of the weight of the meat. Place the meat in a non-reactive container covered by the remaining brine for 5 days at 38° F (3° C.). Be sure the meat is submerged; use a couple of clean dinner plates to hold it down if necessary. (I stopped using rusty horseshoes long ago!) Having “baptized the brisket” five days, flush away the brine and cover the brisket overnight using fresh, cold, water. It is a good idea to change the water once again during this period after about four hours. Finally, rinse the meat and pat it dry. Press and rub freshly cracked black peppercorns into the surface (with more coriander seeds if desired) to form a thick coating. When the meat has dried completely, hang the pieces inside a preheated 140° F. (60° C.) smokehouse and smoke them an hour in your favorite smoke. Hickory is very nice. Careful now, beef is not as forgiving as is pork, and may be easily oversmoked. Next, cover the meat with foil (to hold in moisture) and finish cooking the pastrami inside a “slow” oven at only 200° F. (93° C.). Continue cooking the meat slowly until it eventually reaches an internal meat temperature of 165° F. (74° C.). The meat may also be baked inside a covered Dutch oven if you prefer not to use foil. When the pastrami has cooled to room temperature, place it into the refrigerator 8 hours before slicing.

    “Shotgun Sanford’s .12 Gauge Mustard”
    (Mustard Dressing For Pastrami)

    1/2 cup Coleman’s dry mustard powder
    3/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/2 tspn. pulverized red pepper flakes
    1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1 tspn. prepared horseradish
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1/2 tspn. salt (un-iodized flaked)
    1-1/3 cup mayonnaise
    *water

    Heat the flour in the bottom of a Dutch oven, until it start to turn golden brown. Remove the utensil from the heat and add the remaining ingredients except the mayonnaise. Stir the mixture to blend it. If more moisture is needed, add cold water as you continue stirring. Replace the Dutch oven over the heat and simmer the mixture while continuing to stir. When the mustard begins to thicken from the heat, remove it and allow it to cool for a few hours. Finally add the mayonnaise and stir it until blended. Store the mustard dressing in a glass container for a week before using it on pastrami.

    Best wishes,
    Chuckwagon

  7. “Wounded Witch Trick-Or-Treat Pepperoni Stix” (Ten-pound Recipe) P.2
    Semi-Dry Pepperoni (fast fermented sausage using Bactoferm™ FLC)

    7.0 lbs. lean pork butt
    3.0 lbs. lean beef
    105.00 g. salt
    11.00 g. cure #1
    118.30 g. ice water
    45.50 g. powdered dextrose
    150.00 g. soy protein concentrate
    45.50 g. sugar
    15.00 g. freshly-ground black pepper (grind it “coarse”)
    30.00 g. Hungarian paprika (not Spanish paprika… it’s too bitter)
    14.50 g. fennel seeds
    9.0 g. cayenne pepper (or 14 gr. for very hot flavor)
    1.14 g. Bactoferm™ FLC culture
    19 m.m. collagen casing

    Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer twenty minutes before you use them. Cut the meat into 1” cubes to keep any long strands of sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat (and fat) through a 3/16” plate. Mix the Cure #1 with a little water (for uniform distribution) and add it to the meat. Mix the FLC culture with a little distilled, chlorine-free water and follow the directions on the package allowing the bacteria time to “wake up”. Add the remaining ingredients and develop the proteins. Mix the sausage until “sticky peaks” are formed when the meat is pulled apart. Stuff the mixture into 19 m.m. collagen casings forming a long coil or long lengths. As mentioned before, collagen casing will not hold twisted links. Having allowed the sausage ten minutes to “set up”, simply cut uniform lengths using a pair of sharp scissors, laying them out on smokescreens in your preheated smokehouse at 100°F. The humidity should be elevated to 85%. If you don’t have a curing chamber, use an open pan of water on top of the hotplate but don’t exceed the SHT of 100 degrees for a day. After 24 hours, apply light smoke and raise the smoke house temperature to 115°F. for six hours more. Note that an FLC culture is able to produce lactic acid at this temperature. Now, gradually increase the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature reaches 152°. Careful now… special precaution must be taken not to overcook this delicate, narrow 19 millimeter sausage.

    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

  8. Chuckwagon’s “Outlaw’s Onion Sausage”
    (Fresh-Type “Loose” Sausage)

    2.2 lbs. (1 kg.) pork butt with 30% fat
    18 g. salt
    2.0 g. coarse ground black pepper
    2.0 g. ground thyme
    2 Tblspns. finely chopped onions
    9.0 g powdered dextrose (or 1/2 tspn. sugar)

    Grind the lean (pork butt) through a 3/8” plate and the fat (frozen) through a 1/8” plate. Over medium-high heat, slightly pan fry the onions in a non-stick skillet, adding a teaspoon of water. Stir the onions until the water has cooked away. Allow the onions to cool. (They should be barely translucent). When the onions have returned to room temperature, add all the remaining ingredients to the meat and fat mixture and fold until the ingredients are blended well together. Refrigerate overnight in a refrigerator to meld flavors and use within three days, or freeze any remaining sausage. Brown and use this “loose” sausage in gravy for “biscuits n’ gravy” or your special spaghetti sauce.

    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

  9. El DuckO’s “Paint Chip Sausage”
    (Greek Turkey Sausage)

    Here’s that “Paint Chip” Sausage recipe that I promised. Those of you who are literal minded (you know who you are) should use paint chips in place of the vegetables and “secret blend of herbs and spices” listed here. Don’t worry about density differences between paint chips and spices. If you choose lead paints, soon it won’t matter anymore.

    This is based on a Rytek Kutas recipe called “Greek Turkey Sausage.” My copy of his book is in storage at the moment, but I’ve scribbled the reference down as “Great Sausage Recipes & Meat Curing, 4th ed.” p.183. (Don’t never, ever, agree to selling your house without thinking things like storage issues through.) You’ll like this one if you like Greek food. …or not. We do.

    It’s a fresh sausage, so the usual cautions and precautions apply- – keep it cold, stuff in the usual 22-24 mm size hog casing, cook thoroughly before eating, eat or freeze within four days, do not pass “GO,” do not collect $200. (We’re still mad at Hasbro for doing away with the “iron” token in their Monopoly game. What’s next? …the “sausage grinder” token?)(Oh. Wait. That’s a little “cannon.”)

    Enjoy. This has been scaled so that you can buy a 1# package of ground turkey at the supermarket. In my experience, few commercial ground turkeys take to the air like wild turkeys do, so you should be good with ground commercial turkey.

    You will note a colorful addition to the meat- – the green spinach and cilantro, the yellow garlic, the black (unless you use red/green/black mix) peppercorns, the white feta cheese, the yellow feet and beaks and skin and other unmentionables found in commercial ground turkey. These are a metaphor for paint chips. (Be sure and look up the word “metaphor” before you use real paint chips. Otherwise, please designate me as the beneficiary on your life insurance policies.) For added realism, finely chop the spinach and crush, rather than grind, the peppercorns, to achieve an approximation of paint chip size.

    The recipe (in all its glory):
    Rytek Kutas’ “Greek Turkey Sausage.”
    • 7 oz (190 gm) ground pork (80/20 mix)
    • 1 lb (450 gm) ground turkey (25% or so fat)
    • 13 gm salt (gives 1.5% salt in the batch)
    • 50 ml ice water (dissolve the salt in this)
    • 100 gm Feta cheese (goat milk preferred)
    • 15 gm white onion, chopped and rinsed
    • 2 gm garlic, sliced to resemble paint chips, rinsed
    • 2.2 gm peppercorns (mixed colors), crushed, not ground
    • 1/2 gm cilantro leaf, chopped to paint chip size
    • 1/2 gm oregano leaf, chopped to paint chip size
    • 1/2 gm anise seed (better grind this one)
    • 18 gm spinach, chopped to paint chip size

    Eat this. Enjoy. Then ponder life’s burning question:
    Why is it spelled “turkeys” instead of “turkies” ?

    Duk

  10. “Wounded Witch Trick Or Treat Pepperoni Stix”

    Here is a quick, 2-day semi-dry-cured pepperoni using Bactoferm FLC culture. In many countries, large companies have produced “fast-fermented” type pepperoni for so long that the public has now come to believe that all pepperoni must be “tangy” to be any good. Chr. Hansen in Denmark now produces a Bactoferm™ product (LHP) that is so quick that it can drop a pepperoni product safely below pH 5.0 in merely two days! A forty-two-gram packet of LHP will treat 500 pounds (225 kilo) of meat and any leftover culture may be re-frozen (up to 6 months). In a pinch, people have often used their smokehouses for curing chambers by adding a pan of water to the hotplate for the first few hours. It is also so quick, you must use Cure #1 as there is simply no time allowed for the breakdown involved in Cure #2 from sodium nitrate to sodium nitrite and ultimately, nitric oxide (not to be confused with nitrous oxide). It is the nitric oxide that actually cures the meat.

    It is most convenient to use collagen casings to make 19 m.m. sticks. Ask for the brown, “smoked” casing. They are simple to use, come in a sterile accordion-type tube, and load on your stuffing horn with no water, no mess, and no fuss. All you have to do is crank out some large coils of the stuff onto the table, let it “set-up” five minutes, and then cut it into one-foot (or desired) lengths with a pair of scissors.

    Most suppliers are now offering a stuffing tube for 19 m.m. casings. I made mine some time ago using a six inch section of stainless steel tubing I found at a plumbing supply store. I welded it into an old collar and it has worked perfectly for me for years. Now, you can just buy ‘em to fit smaller sizes of casings. I just can’t bring myself to toss out “ol’ reliable”!

    One more thing… collagen will not hold twisted links and must be tied with string. However, in smaller diameters, it may be easily cut into lengths using scissors. Collagen doesn’t have the strength to hang from smokesticks without breaking, so I’ve just always laid out the sausages on smokescreens – they’ve always worked perfectly.

    Here’s how to make ten pounds:

    7.0 lbs. lean pork butt
    3.0 lbs. lean beef
    105.00 g. salt
    11.00 g. cure #1
    118.30 g. ice water
    45.50 g. powdered dextrose
    150.00 g. soy protein concentrate
    45.50 g. sugar
    15.00 g. freshly-ground black pepper (grind it “coarse”)
    30.00 g. Hungarian paprika (not Spanish paprika… it’s too bitter)
    14.50 g. fennel seeds
    9.0 g. cayenne pepper (or 14 gr. for very hot flavor)
    1.14 g. Bactoferm™ FLC culture
    19 m.m. collagen casing

    Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer twenty minutes before you use them. Cut the meat into 1” cubes to keep any long strands of sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat (and fat) through a 3/16” plate. Mix the Cure #1 with a little water (for uniform distribution) and add it to the meat. Mix the FLC culture with a little distilled, chlorine-free water and follow the directions on the package allowing the bacteria time to “wake up”. Add the remaining ingredients and develop the proteins. Mix the sausage until “sticky peaks” are formed when the meat is pulled apart. Stuff the mixture into 19 m.m. collagen casings forming a long coil or long lengths. As mentioned before, collagen casing will not hold twisted links. Having allowed the sausage ten minutes to “set up”, simply cut uniform lengths using a pair of sharp scissors, laying them out on smokescreens in your preheated smokehouse at 100°F. The humidity should be elevated to 85%. If you don’t have a curing chamber, use an open pan of water on top of the hotplate but don’t exceed the SHT of 100 degrees for a day. After 24 hours, apply light smoke and raise the smoke house temperature to 115°F. for six hours more. Note that an FLC culture is able to produce lactic acid at this temperature. Now, gradually increase the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature reaches 152°. Careful now… special precaution must be taken not to overcook this delicate, narrow 19 millimeter sausage.

    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

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