2 – SAUSAGES AT HOME…………. (“Fresh” and “Cooked-Cured” Types)

2 – SAUSAGES AT HOME…………. (“Fresh” and “Cooked-Cured” Types)

Much of what our members do fits into this category. …so “let ‘er rip!”

 

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217 thoughts on “2 – SAUSAGES AT HOME…………. (“Fresh” and “Cooked-Cured” Types)

  1. Sounds delicious.

    Thanks for posting first!

    …just finished a batch of Texas Hot Links and a batch of shrimp sausage today. I’ll smoke the surviving hot links tomorrow (two were sacrificed for dinner tonight). Will let people know how the shrimp recipe turns out- – this is my first attempt at it. It was posted on WD, but was originally from the Bradley Smoker forum.

    Best regards,
    Duk

  2. I would love to see both recipes Duk. I have been looking at Seafood sausage recipes but have not made any sausage yet. Did you use any cream in the recipe ?

    Hot link recipes run the gamut, some recipes with just brisket and some seasonings while others have the entire kitchen in them.

  3. I’ll post the Shrimp Sausage recipe on the “Recipes” department of the SausagesWest.com website. …likewise, the hot links recipe.

    All I can say about the shrimp sausage recipe is “WOW!” This one’s a real good one. I used “salad shrimp,” the little bitty ones, whole in it, but ground the rest of the meat twice through my fine plate. …no milk or cream.

    The hot links recipe which I’ll post uses bacon ends and pieces. Be very careful about how much salt you add, and rinse the bacon before you use it. (You’ll see the note.) My spreadsheet pegs the salt at 1.5%, but I think it’s a tad over 2%. …will modify the spreadsheet as well as the recipe.

  4. My new mincer arrived a couple of days ago (LEM #8 big bite) together with a transformer (as we run on 220 Volt – if we have power).
    It’s now out of the box and installed. Just need a bit of cooler weather, some meat and a good idea of which sausage to make this time around.
    Been making a lot of highly spiced Chorizo, roughly according to Len Poli’s recipe for Goan Chorizo and I really like them, but it’s time for something different……
    Will keep you all informed

    1. Badjak – enjoy your new #8 – I’ve been using mine for a couple of months and am more than satisfied with it although I have to slowly use small chunks of frozen fat withiout loading up the auger to avoid smearing and flipping the breaker. Phil

  5. Yesterday, we started dry-curing a 20 lb. batch of Semi-Dry Cured Summer Sausage using a recipe from CW he calls “Saddle Bum’s Smoky Beef Stick”. We will grind and stuff on Tuesday, ferment until Friday morning, and then smoke to finish. During the three to four days of required drying, the room smells heavenly! Also makes great Christmas gifts, if you can keep it around.

    1. Hi Kids! I want to come and smell your house. Wow! You folks are having way too much fun making sausage. That “Smoky Beef Stick” is a nice choice for holiday gift giving. The smoky flavor is amazing and the flavor of the ingredients is just right for this type of sausage. You’ll enjoy it, I know. I use fancy casings then put ’em in a plastic presentation netting. Fasten the ends with hog-ring pliers and tie on a great looking bow of ribbon with curls and you’ve got a first-class gift for Christmas. Keep up the good work Jim n’ Jean and enjoy every minute of your hobby together. Oh, and thanks for signing up with us!
      Best Wishes,
      Chuckwagon

    2. My timing was way off on this one! After just 24 hours I measured pH of 5.1, but that was about 6 p.m. that evening. I waited until morning to smoke it. By then the pH was 4.5. I gave it 4 hours of Hickory smoke, and finished it at 148° F. After cooling, I let it hang at 60° F and 70% Rh until it lost 28% from green weight. The smoky odor filled the lower level of the house.
      The taste was fantastic, although the low pH gave a very strong tang to the sausage. I guess I must trim my beef a little too well. I thought it could use a bit more fat content, and will add some at the next go! Great recipe Chuckwagon, thanks!

  6. Grew up on British sausages, been making sausages, fresh, smoked and cooked and air dried for about 3 years. However, until last week had never made any British sausages. Anyway I made some Lincolnshire and Cumberland sausages. I am enjoying them a lot. There are quite a few other regional varieties which I will get around to making. Next Tuesday I am going to have a fry up. sausages, bacon (providing I have time over the weekend to smoke it) fried bread (Sunday’s home made bread should be nice and stale by then) and some home made baked beans. Why Tuesday, well its a celebration of me starting a new job later in the day.

    At a slight tangent. I am not so keen on mace and nutmeg in fresh sausages. However, the amount used in this recipe is slight and it works well.

    1. One sausage I am keen to make is the Oxford sausage. Traditionally it was made then dipped in egg and rolled in breadcrumbs and fried. However some claim it has always been stuffed. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_sausage) Oxford sausages are a distinctive variety of pork and veal sausage commonly associated with, and thought to have been developed in, the English city of Oxford. Traditionally, Oxford sausages are noted for the addition of veal, in contrast to many traditional British sausages which contain only pork, and their high level of spice seasoning. References to the “Oxford” style of sausage date back to at least the early 18th century, but it was more widely popularised owing to inclusion in Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management, first published in 1861. I found a copy of Mrs Beeton’s book and her and more recent versions are not that spicy and contain lemon zest and fresh herbs. What blows me away about her recipe for this and her beef sausages is the use of 33% suet.

      Two other sausages that I am going to look into are the Marylebone (area of London) Sausage and the Square Slicing Sausage aka Lorne (I think this is not stuffed and comes from Scotland).

  7. Mark, I’m with you in liking the British sausage too. However, I’d like to share one of my favorite recipes with you. It is a Slovenian sausage recipe but shucks, don’t let that scare you! Below are the instructions for three different way to make it. This original recipe for Krainerwurst required some research a few years back and it is for “cured-smoked-cooked” style sausage. You may prefer to make “fresh” sausage by omitting the Cure #1. Just keep it in the fridge and use it within three days. I really like the “cured-cooked-smoked” version also. The Duck makes it all the time and so do I. Perhaps you’d like to try a “semi-dry cured” version of the Krainerwurst. If so, just add the Cure #1, a tablespoon of sugar, and a single gram of LHP culture. I hope you give it a try Mark.
    Best Wishes,
    Chuckwagon

    Krainerwurst (Slovenian Sausage)
    (Cured, Smoked, Cooked)

    Genuine Slovenian Krainerwurst has pretty specific traditional instructions. It must contain a minimum of 68% pork, 12% beef, and 20% fresh pork belly (bacon) with a little added water and only salt, garlic, and black pepper added for seasoning. The meat must be cut into 10 to 13 mm. pieces, and the bacon into 8 to 10 mm. pieces. Only 32-36 mm. hog casings are used, and links are formed in pairs of 12 to 16 cm lengths having the weight of 180 to 220 grams. Wooden skewers are used to hold the pairs together. The sausages are cured and then hot-smoked at relatively low temperatures. It’s interesting to note that the recipe has been widely misrepresented over time, especially in America where various spices and cheeses have been added. Here is the basic recipe:

    7 lbs. pork butt with fat
    1-1/2 lbs. lean beef chuck
    1-1/2 lbs. fresh pork bacon
    2 level tspns. Cure #1 (if making “cured-cooked-smoked” sausage or “semi-dry cured” sausage).
    1 gram Bactoferm™ LHP culture (if making “semi-dry cured sausage).
    4 tblspns. salt
    3 garlic cloves (crushed and minced)
    1 tblspn. granulated garlic
    2 tblspns. coarse black pepper (freshly ground)
    32-36 mm. hog casings

  8. Krainerwurst Sausage (Continued)

    To make “fresh” sausage:
    Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer while you separate the fat from the lean meat using a sharp knife. Cut the meat into 1-1/2 ” cubes to keep sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat using the 3/8” plate and the pork fat using a 3/16” plate. Mix the Cure #1 with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Work with small batches, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Next, mix the meat into a sticky meat paste by adding the remaining ingredients and kneading the mixture to develop the primary bind. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour. “Fresh” sausage must be refrigerated and consumed within three days, or frozen for future use.

    To make “cured-cooked-smoked” sausage:
    Grind the meat using the 3/8” plate and the pork fat using a 3/16” plate. Remember to add Cure #1. For ten pounds of meat, use 2 level teaspoons of cure mixed with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Mix the cure and ingredients thoroughly throughout the primary bind. Work with small batches, kneading the meat into a sticky meat paste, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour. Place the sausages into a preheated 130°F. (54°C.) smokehouse for an hour (with the damper open) before introducing hickory smoke and adjusting the damper to only ¼ open. Gradually, only a couple of degrees every twenty minutes, raise the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature (IMT) registers 150°F. This procedure must be done slowly to avoid breaking the fat. Remove the sausages, showering them with cold water until the IMT drops to less than 90°F. (32°C.). This sausage remains perishable and must be refrigerated until it is grilled on a smoky BBQ grill.

    To make “semi-dry cured” sausage:
    Grind the meat using the 3/8” plate and the pork fat using a 3/16” plate. Remember to add Cure #1, a tablespoon of sugar, and one gram of LHP culture to the recipe. For ten pounds of meat, use 2 level teaspoons of cure mixed with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Next, prepare the culture by following the mixing directions on the packet. Use non-chlorinated water and mix the cure and ingredients thoroughly throughout the primary bind. Work with small batches, kneading the meat into a sticky meat paste, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings.

    If you have a “curing chamber”, place the sausages in it and ferment at 100°F for 24 hours in 90% humidity. If a drier sausage is desired, ferment it for 48 hours.

    If you do not have a “curing chamber”, place one pound of regular table salt onto a cookie sheet with a lip around it. Spread the salt out evenly and add just enough water to barely cover the salt. Place the cookie sheet and salt in the bottom of an old fridge (unplugged) or your home kitchen oven. Keep the oven warm by using the pilot light in a gas model, or a hundred-watt light bulb covered with a large coffee can with several holes drilled in it. This will produce a warm area for a 2-day fermentation period at about 70% humidity.

    When the fermentation has finished, place the links into your pre-heated 120°F smoker and introduce warm smoke. Use a hygrometer and try to maintain a 70% humidity during the process. Gradually, raise the temperature of the smokehouse by merely 2 degrees every 20 minutes. Do NOT attempt to boost the heat to shorten the duration. This procedure may take several hours. Monitor the IMT (internal meat temperature) and when it reaches 140°F, discontinue the cooking-smoking.

    1. I had to delete the posting to edit it.

      Thanks CW. I have some coppa drying in my cabinet. When that is done and I have based off an essay (doing a bit of study) I plan to make some semi dried sausage. I shall consider this. I do want to make some more air dried salami, but I hope that it will not be to long before my house it knocked down. I will then be studying, finding a new place to live and drying sausages. That is a bit too much for me.

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